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Research Team

Professor Justin Marshall

Principle Investigator

Professor Justin Marshall is an experienced digital craftsperson, maker and researcher. For over twenty years his research has been investigating the integration of digital design and production technologies into craft practices. As such he is interested in the role and significance of digital tools within craft practice, both in terms of new aesthetic opportunities, and how the use of this toolset can promote debate around the nature of technological mediation in creative practice and challenges the concept of the ‘handmade’. He has exhibited digital craftwork both nationally and internationally. 
More broadly he is interested in how craft, as ethos, and as a materially sensitive and human-centred practice, can have value in multidisciplinary research projects. He has been involved in numerous collaborative projects that bring together diverse teams to investigate areas beyond the normal scope of craft practitioners. 
Alongside this project he is also Co-Director of the EU Marie Curie funded OpenDoTT project, which is investigating Trust and the IoT.  

Professor Jayne Wallace

Co-Investigator

As Professor of Craft, Digital Creativity and Wellbeing in the School of Design my work explores the potential of design and digital technologies, jewellery and the act of making to support sense of self across a range of human contexts. I’m co-founder and co-editor of the Journal of Jewellery Research with Dr Roberta Bernabei and co-founder of the Research Through Design conference series with Prof Joyce Yee.
At Northumbria, I lead the School of Design’s CoCreate research community, where I work with a brilliant group of academics, post-doctoral, doctoral and MRes researchers all exploring cocreative approaches at the intersection of design, technology and participation in a range of human contexts. 
I was principal investigator on the Enabling Ongoingness research project funded by the EPSRC which has led to ongoing research with St Oswald’s Hospice, Newcastle – and as well as Co-Investigator on hiCraft I’m Co-Investigator on the EPSRC Centre for Digital Citizens, Co-Investigator on the REAPPEAR project funded by PETRAS via the EPSRC and Co-Investigator on the EU Marie Curie funded OpenDoTT project. You can find out more about my work from my personal website.

Professor Jon Rogers

Co-Investigator

Jon is a professor of design at Northumbria University with twenty five  years of experience working at the interface between design and emerging technologies.    Following a three year fellowship based in Mozilla Berlin (2016-2019)  he is focussed on understanding our changing relationship with things as they increasingly become connected to the internet. Jon is involved with a number of interrelated project that  includes:

PI on the Marie Skłodowska-Curie doctoral training programme OpenDoTT; Co-I on an Swiss National Foundation project VA-PEPR; Co-I on URKI funded projects hiCraft, REAPPEAR and the Centre for Digital Citizens, Further work includes collaborating with the design research agency  Quicksand and the National Institute of Design in India  to explore how we can design for India’s sustainable  digital futures relating to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals through the recently completed GCRF funded project  Decentralising Digital.

He is is an active speaker at events that include Unbox Festival (India), SXSW (USA), ThingsCon (Berlin) and his collaborative work has been shown in the V&A, the Design Museum (London), Ikea Museum (Sweden) and Triennali Milano. Jon was awarded a PhD in Artificial Intelligence from Imperial College in 2000 and completed his undergraduate in Electronic Engineering  from the university of Hull in 1994.  He lives by the sea in Fife, Scotland. 

Dr. Nick Taylor

Co-Investigator

I am a Senior Lecturer in Human–Computer Interaction in Open Lab at Newcastle University.
My research sits at the intersection of design, technology and society. We attempt to understand the impact of emerging technologies and practices, and imagine, prototype and explore possible preferable futures around those technologies. Previously, I received my PhD from Lancaster University and have lectured in DJCAD at the University of Dundee and at Northumbria University. I am particularly interested in:
Technology to support neighbourhoods and communities, especially for civic engagement.
Designing a trusted Internet of Things by embedding values including privacy, openness, decentralisation, inclusion and literacy.
Making, DIY and craft approaches to technology, particularly to support people in harnessing technology for themselves.
Participatory methods combing a range of approaches from speculative design to long-term deployments of functioning prototypes ‘in the wild’.
I’m currently working on projects including The Reappearing Computer (REAPPEAR), the Centre for Digital Citizens and OpenDoTT.

Dr. Philip Heslop

Research Associate

Phil is interested in engaging and empowering populations – especially the digitally marginalised – to understand and utilise the technology that impacts on their lives, in particular with their health and wellness, education and engagement with society. He is interested in working alongside participants, academics and industrial partners to enable, teach and develop technology-enabled experiences that deliver engagement and empowerment across a wide range of platforms, from IOT to web-apps to VR to tangible artefacts.

Phil has a rich and varied history in Human Computer Interaction, Internet of Things, Informatics, Data Visualisation, Computer Graphics, Virtual Reality and Games. He began his career as a games developer focusing on AI and graphics, then moved into academia where he managed Newcastle University’s Virtual Reality facility for more than 10 years and a Fabrication Lab for more than 3 years.

His research career started in Educational Technology, and he was awarded his PhD in 2015. Since then he has worked on a wide range of projects from Educational Technology to Medical Informatics to Internet of Things.